Why do people become counsellors/psychotherapists?


This is a question I am often asked by people in general.   As can be seen from the below IACP video the reasons that bring people to train as a therapist are varied and tend to come on the back of previous work & life experiences.

Of course there are also those who work in the counselling/psychotherapy profession directly from training as psychologists having undergraduate and doctorate level training that can take nearly a decade.

Also see a second video below where IACP accredited therapists explain what they feel are the best things about the work of being a therapist.

 

How is your therapist doing?

Many clients (and people in general) become curious about the therapists they are talking to especially as the therapeutic relationship builds.  Indeed sometimes a client may bump into their therapist outside the therapy room, out shopping, with their family etc.

All sorts of questions seem to emerge – has my therapist children?  what issues have they experienced themselves?  What brought them to this vocation? How much money are they making from this?

While in many modalities  limited self disclosure does occur within the therapeutic relationship the process is obviously not focused on the therapist.

This article explores the issue from the perspective of a practitioner in private practice in Ireland and highlights issues many therapists will relate to.  Might have some answers for those curious too!

 

Acknowledging race in mental health services

The 21st March marked International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination.

The following article from the College of Psychiatrists of Ireland blog outlines how race & ethnicity is an area that poses a variety of challenges not only in terms of the mental health of ethnic minorities generally but also in terms of the provision of supports and differences in how that support is experienced.

Talk Therapy Dublin currently  has  40% of active clients born outside of Ireland and these clients often describe issues & experiences affected & augmented by almost constant minority stress.  

Sexuality & Gender are broadly discussed by the mainstream in Ireland and much has been done in terms of acknowledging minority stress in these areas but when it comes to ethnic minorities and their experience of Ireland in 2018 there is a long way to go. Our attitudes to and the experiences of our own indigenous ethnic minority, the travelling community is an example of this.