Online Counselling – Who are you talking to??

The below article from the UK describes how the NHS is struggling to cope with the demand for online counselling services.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/online-counselling-therapy-mental-health-mentally-ill-exploited-unaccredited-nhs-a8123131.html

In Ireland online counselling & psychotherapy is also on the rise,  this demand provides an opportunity for unscrupulous individuals to take advantage particularly using the internet to mislead and confuse vulnerable clients looking for help.

Here at Talk Therapy Dublin we adhere to the IACP ethical guidelines on skype/online counselling.

Anyone thinking of online or phone counselling should research their practitioner and

1: make sure the practitioner is qualified & has training to work with clients  using this technology,

2: That they are a fully qualified/accredited therapist with one of the main accreditation bodies

3: Are familiar with the pertinent ethical guidelines covering this area of counselling & psychotherapy.

 

Economic Boom & Bust – The “business cycle” and mental health

Over the past seven years my community based work as a therapist and in advocacy roles has put me face to face with the harsh effects of economic recession.

I have worked with many individuals & families experiencing first hand the effects of sudden homelessness,  unexpected unemployment and serious accommodation issues to name but a few.

These experiences have repeatedly brought home to me how economic recession and the “boom bust” nature of the business cycle has serious implications for the nations mental health.

As we experience a new part of this cycle,  it is worth pausing to think about whether our current approach to areas like health, housing and employment has evolved at all in light of recent experiences.

This becomes more urgent when considering impending changes to global corporate tax policy, Brexit and our growing/ageing population are all likely to figure in the next phase of this cycle.

This article highlights results of research led by Trinity College Dublin (based on the Growing Up in Ireland study)  and puts some data and context behind the discussion.